Monday, April 29, 2019

1 The Silent Woman by Terry Lynn Thomas Blog Tour and Giveaway

The Silent Woman
by Terry Lynn Thomas

Publication Date: April 11, 2018
HQ Digital
Paperback & eBook; 384 Pages
Genre: Historical Mystery
Series: Cat Carlisle, Book One






Would you sell your secrets?

Catherine Carlisle is trapped in a loveless marriage and the threat of World War Two is looming. She sees no way out… that is until a trusted friend asks her to switch her husband’s papers in a desperate bid to confuse the Germans.

Soon Catherine finds herself caught up in a deadly mixture of espionage and murder. Someone is selling secrets to the other side, and the evidence seems to point right at her.

Can she clear her name before it’s too late?

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Google Play | Kobo

About the Author

TERRY LYNN THOMAS grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, which explains her love of foggy beaches and Gothic mysteries. When her husband promised to buy Terry a horse and the time to write if she moved to Mississippi with him, she jumped at the chance. Although she had written several novels and screenplays prior to 2006, after she relocated to the South she set out to write in earnest and has never looked back.

Terry Lynn writes the Sarah Bennett Mysteries, set on the California coast during the 1940s, which feature a misunderstood medium in love with a spy. The Drowned Woman is a recipient of the IndieBRAG Medallion. She also writes the Cat Carlisle Mysteries, set in Britain during World War II. The first book in this series, The Silent Woman, came out in April 2018 and has since become a USA TODAY bestseller. The Family Secret is slated for release in March 2019. When she’s not writing, you can find Terry Lynn riding her horse, walking in the woods with her dogs, or visiting old cemeteries in search of story ideas.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, April 29
Review at Coffee and Ink

Tuesday, April 30

Wednesday, May 1
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Thursday, May 2
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, May 3

Monday, May 6

Tuesday, May 7
Review at Macs Books

Wednesday, May 8

Thursday, May 9

Friday, May 10
Review at Hooked on Books

Monday, May 13
Review at Comet Readings
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Tuesday, May 14

Wednesday, May 15
Review at The Lit Bitch

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a $20 Amazon Gift Card! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.



Tuesday, April 23, 2019

1 The Time Collector by Gwendolyn Womack: Excerpt and Giveaway


The Time Collector by Gwendolyn Womack

Publication Date: April 16, 2019
Picador USA
eBook & Paperback; 368 Pages
Genre: Historical/Romantic Suspense


Travel through time with the touch of a hand.

Roan West was born with an extraordinary gift: he can perceive the past of any object he touches. A highly skilled pyschometrist, he uses his talents to find and sell valuable antiques, but his quiet life in New Orleans is about to change. Stuart, a fellow pyschometrist and Roan’s close friend, has used his own abilities to unearth several out-of-place-artifacts or “ooparts”—like a ring that once belonged to the seventeenth-century mathematician and philosopher René Descartes, but was found buried in prehistoric bedrock.

The relics challenge recorded history, but soon after the discovery, Stuart disappears, making him one of several psychometrists who have recently died or vanished without a trace. When Roan comes across a viral video of a young woman who has discovered a priceless pocket watch just by “sensing” it, he knows he has to warn her—but will Melicent Tilpin listen? And can Roan find Stuart before it’s too late?

The quest for answers will lead Roan and Melicent around the world—before it brings them closer to each other and a startling truth—in the latest romantic thriller from Gwendolyn Womack, the bestselling, PRISM Award-winning author of The Memory Painter and The Fortune Teller.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Books-a-Million | iBooks | IndieBound | Kobo 


Excerpt

If an historian could be compared to a mad scientist with a laboratory, this room would definitely fit the bill. Instead of beakers and vials it was words and relics. There was also something incredibly intimate about the space. There were no pin lights for the glass displays and the books all looked well-worn and used—like they’d been read too many times.
Melicent turned toward the desk, and a lone photograph on the shelf caught her eye. At first she thought it was a picture of Roan, but it was his father. Robert West had glasses on, his black hair was blowing in the wind, and his head was thrown back in laughter. The shot was a close-up, taken on a mountaintop with a ledge of rock and clouds visible on each side of the frame.
Melicent studied his profile. The jawline, the aquiline nose—everything about him was Roan. She reached out and picked up the metal frame to study the photo more closely.
The moment she held the picture in her hand she heard the music.
The song sounded far-off, playing in the distance. Then it began to gain resonance, like a radio in the room, and she recognized it as “Unchained Melody” by the Righteous Brothers.
Oh, my love, my darling, I’ve hungered for your touch
A long, lonely time . . .
Images and thoughts cascaded over the music. They’d been woven into the melody. Roan’s parents had gotten married in New Orleans. It had been a boisterous celebration with a wedding parade down Bourbon Street and a second line brass band. The next day they’d flown to Mexico City for their honeymoon. Jocelyn had taken the photo of Robert right as the sun was rising on top of Popocatépetl, the most active volcano in Mexico and one of the highest mountains in North America. They’d camped overnight to catch the sunrise. Within the silence at the summit, they could feel the rumbling energy of the earth. There had not been an eruption since 1947, but they thought there might be another in their lifetime. They both agreed Roan was conceived that night.
The imprints within the frame poured into her. Melicent didn’t know how long she stood there until she turned to find Roan standing in the doorway with two wineglasses in hand. Embarrassment flooded her cheeks and she put the picture frame back down.
“Your father’s picture,” she said, stating the obvious and realizing she’d just witnessed some very personal memories.
“Yes.” He came toward her to offer her the wine.
She murmured her thanks and turned back toward the picture, still unbalanced from the deluge of information it had imparted. “Have you touched this?”
Roan stared at the picture of his father and shook his head. “I don’t touch my parents’ things. It’d be infringing.”
He hadn’t meant to say it as a reprimand, but still she could feel a fresh flush on her face—she had infringed. It hadn’t been intentional, but she’d seen private moments. Every anniversary Jocelyn would play “Unchained Melody” to hear her wedding song. It’s why the photo was so full of the music.
Melicent could feel the lingering emotions from the imprints squeezing her throat, taking away any words she might have said. Instead she took a sip of the wine. After reading the imprints, it felt like the lines of Jocelyn’s life and her own had momentarily blurred, and the wedding song was an echo in the room that would never fade.
Roan had a closed look on his face. “They were complicated. They divorced when I was thirteen.” It was obvious he didn’t like talking about it. “Some people aren’t meant to be together even if they want to be. Life gets in the way.”
Melicent looked up at him and realized he wasn’t just talking about his parents. She set her wine down and took a step toward him. “I disagree.”
His eyes darkened. “Melicent,” he said in warning.
Ignoring the caution in his voice, she took the final step and kissed him, their mouths twisting in the dance that had begun on the plane and never stopped.

Praise for The Time Collector

"A wonderfully intriguing tale, filled with the mystery of objects that tell a story. The Time Collector's fast pace and fascinating premise will delight history and romance lovers."―Yangsze Choo, New York Times bestselling author of The Ghost Bride

"A compelling exploration of time, history, and our primal need to connect with the past, The Time Collector is also a rollicking adventure through ancient mysteries and the moving story of two stunningly drawn characters, chasing the answer to the question of what it means to be human."―Charlie Lovett, New York Times bestselling author of The Bookman's Tale and The Lost Book of the Grail

"Gwendolyn Womack weaves a suspenseful tale that tackles the question of 'time'―how it’s measured, its impact on nature and human consciousness―and I could hardly put it down! The Time Collector is a treasure trove of ancient artifacts, mysticism, and intrigue, sprinkled with a dash of romance―my very favorite things. What a book!”―Heather Webb, international bestselling author of Meet Me in Monaco

"The Time Collector is a fascinating tale of psychometrists, people who touch an object and sense the stories embedded within them. Pick up this book and you too will be transported across the globe and the centuries into exhilarating worlds filled with history and mystery, magic and mysticism, romance and danger. Its pages make the past come alive. Once you hold this object in your hands, you won’t be able to put it down."―Amy Weiss, author of Crescendo

About the Author

Originally from Houston, Texas, GWENDOLYN WOMACK studied theater at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks and holds an MFA in Directing Theatre, Video, and Cinema from California Institute of the Arts. She is the USA Today bestselling author of The Fortune Teller and the RWA Prism Award-winning reincarnation thriller, The Memory Painter. She resides in Los Angeles with her family.

For more information please visit Gwendolyn Womack's website. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Tuesday, April 16
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Wednesday, April 17

Thursday, April 18

Friday, April 19

Monday, April 22

Tuesday, April 23

Wednesday, April 24
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Thursday, April 25
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, April 26

Tuesday, April 30
Excerpt at Kimber Li

Wednesday, May 1
Review & Excerpt at Clarissa Reads it All

Thursday, May 2
Review & Excerpt at Broken Teepee

Friday, May 3
Review at Tar Heel Reader

Saturday, May 4
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Sunday, May 5

Monday, May 6

Wednesday, May 8

Thursday, May 9

Friday, May 10
Review at Coffee and Ink

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a signed copy of The Time Collector! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 10th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Time Collector


Monday, April 22, 2019

0 Gloved Heart Feature


GLOVED HEART

By Charlotte Brentwood



Can she ever trust again?

Amy Miller is struggling to come to terms with her new life as a mother, while being a reluctant guest in a rigid gentry household. A victim of abuse, she is determined to never trust a man again.

Henry Russell has loved Amy for as long as he can remember, but his family want nothing to do with her. A chance encounter with Amy rekindles a friendship which might save them both.

The discovery of a secret which holds the key to Amy’s past will change them forever, and jeopardise any chance they have for happiness. Can Henry show Amy that true love will give her everything she could ever need?
Note, although this is a 'sweet' read, there is some subject matter that may offend sensitive readers, including mention of a rape and very mild violence and coarse language.


Buy page for GLOVED HEART: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07P1QF65D

 A word from the author:


I hope readers enjoy the second book in the “Hearts of Amberley” series. GLOVED HEART can be read as a standalone but if you’ve read THE VAGABOND VICAR you’ll enjoy seeing your favourite characters again.

As a mother of a young baby, I was able to pour my heart into this story of a new mother, Amy Miller, adjusting to her life in less than ideal circumstances. She has sworn off men for good, but she comes to rely on the friendship of Henry Russell. She resists her growing feelings for him, building walls around her heart. Just as she begins to trust, the revelation of a secret will ruin everything. 

This is also a book about strong women and the relationships between them. It’s really the women who drive the story and I loved exploring their unique bonds despite their different stations in life. The men provide the sparks and also the problems, just like in real life!


Excerpt:


Amy was glad of the ride back to Briarwood. She was so weary she thought her legs might give way. Her emotions were close to the surface, threatening to brim over. Henry had touched on more than one nerve with his innocent line of questioning just now. He was right to wonder why a respectable couple such as the Fortescues, who she had hardly said a word to in her life, would stoop so low as to house an unwed mother when no one else wanted her. She had asked herself that question many times; it was reasonable for him to wonder too.
    She wanted to believe his assertions that they wanted to make her more like them so she would belong. But she couldn’t bring herself to foster such a happy illusion; she was no more an innocent young girl who would see the best in people first. She knew most people were hiding something, and their actions were not always a good indicator of their motivations or intentions. In fact, sometimes they acted to deliberately deceive. She couldn’t believe the Fortescues would intentionally hurt her, as there was undeniably an altruistic motive for most of their actions. But their efforts to re-make her in the image of a lady were an affront to her very identity.
    “Miss Miller?”
    Amy turned to see Henry waiting for her on the cart. She laughed at him. “Come now, Henry, don’t address me as if you were my chauffeur. It’s only Amy, and it always has been.”
She stepped towards the box and he automatically offered his hand to help her up. She stared at it, dismayed.
    It was perfectly natural for him to help her up into her seat, but despite her recent familiarity with him, she still could not stand to let their hands touch. She tried to fight the irrational terror which overtook her. Nothing bad would happen, it would be over in a matter of seconds and Henry was not going to abuse the situation, was he? But she could not bring herself to put her hands in his.
    “I’m sorry,” she said.
    He shook his head as if to dismiss her apology. “It’s nothing, just put your foot here, and hold on here, and you can pull yourself up.”
    She nodded, did as he instructed, and managed to hoist herself up onto the seat.
    Henry took up the reins. “Are you comfortable?”
    She met his eyes and nodded again, startled by how close his face was to hers. “Thank you.” Her voice came out as a squeak and she immediately felt herself colouring. She focussed on the lane ahead as Henry brought the cart around and steered the mare down towards the road.
    He sat as far as he could to the right of her while still maintaining control of the cart, but the seat was not very wide, so their thighs were still only inches apart. She could see his muscles flexing within his buckskin trousers. Suddenly she was unbearably warm.
    Comfortable? Perhaps too comfortable.
    She could not resist taking sly glances at him as they bounced along towards her home. The freckles across his nose had multiplied, giving him a boyish charm. His shock of fiery hair was tossed about in unruly waves like a turbulent sea. He caught him looking at her, and threw her a bashful smile, which she couldn’t help returning before forcing her eyes to her lap. She caught a whiff of his scent; he smelled of the grasses and earth and a rich, masculine aroma.
    The motion of his hands guiding the reins caught her attention as they rounded a corner, and she took in his strong, toned forearms. He’d rolled his shirt up above his elbows, and even beneath all that fabric his upper arms bulged. His chest strained against his waistcoat. He was a robust working man, of course he would be… strapping. It was just that she’d never had such leisure to observe all this before. Or perhaps she had just never taken notice, never appreciated him in his masculinity. She’d been a slip of a girl when she’d last spent any length of time with him, without any notions of forming attachments. Now, she was all too aware of him, and the nearness of him. She began to feel a little light-headed, and her heart seemed to be pulsing through her entire body.
    She hadn’t felt like this since… her breath quickened as a painful pang hit her heart. She’d rather not remember the last time.
    “Amy? Are you all right?”
    Henry was looking at her seriously as he guided the cart through the gates that led to Briarwood.
    She tried to slow her breathing, but the rising panic could not be quelled.
    The last time she had felt this way, it had nearly destroyed her. It had made her giddy, blind, defenceless. She’d been a gullible fool, and she had paid the price for her infatuation with her innocence.
    Fear closed over her heart in a vice-like grip, and she clutched the sides of the seat with white knuckles. She could not explain to him, could not summon any words lest she begin to cry.
    The cart came to a stop outside the house, and she leapt to the ground, nearly falling over.
    “Amy!” Henry cried, dismounting in a flash and coming around to her side. “What on earth is the matter?”
    She darted away from him, wishing she hadn’t let her fancies get the better of her, that she could go back to the simplicity of their recent friendship. Perhaps she still could if not tempted in such a way.
    “Goodbye, Henry,” she called as she began walking away from him. “Thank you.”
    Then she turned and took quick steps up to the front door, banging until she was granted admittance. Once inside, the house felt like a safe place for the first time. She was in no danger of being overcome by treacherous feelings here. She went to her room and closed the door, leaning back against it. She would have no reason to see Henry again, and it was just as well. She could not risk putting her heart in danger again.



Author bio:
Charlotte developed serious crushes on a series of men from age fifteen: Darcy, Knightley, Wentworth and Brandon. A bookworm and scribbler for as long as she can remember, Charlotte always dreamed of sharing her stories with the world.

Earning a degree in communication studies, she was seduced by the emerging digital world and has since worked with the web and in marketing. She is a member of the Auckland chapter of RWNZ. 


Now mother to an adorable human tornado, Charlotte is trying to find the time for reading, seaside walks, warbling at the piano and quaffing far too many hot chocolates.


Friday, April 19, 2019

0 Song of Songs by Marc Graham: Guest Post, Giveaway, and Excerpt! #HFVBTBlogTours


Song of Songs: A Novel of the Queen of Sheba
by Marc Graham

Publication Date: April 16, 2019
Blank Slate Press
Paperback; 400 Pages
Genre: Historical Fiction


Lift the veil of legend for the untold story of Makeda, the Queen of Sheba, and Bathsheba, wife and mother of Israel’s first kings.

When Makeda, the slave-born daughter of the chieftain of Saba, comes of age, she wins her freedom and inherits her father's titles along with a crumbling earthwork dam that threatens her people's survival. When she learns of a great stone temple being built in a land far to the north, Makeda leads a caravan to the capital of Yisrael to learn how to build a permanent dam and secure her people's prosperity.

On her arrival, Makeda discovers that her half-sister Bilkis (also known as Bathsheba) who was thought to have died in a long-ago flash flood, not only survived, but has become Queen of Yisrael. Not content with her own wealth, Bilkis intends to claim the riches of Saba for herself by forcing Makeda to marry her son. But Bilkis’s designs are threatened by the growing attraction between Makeda and Yetzer abi-Huram, master builder of Urusalim’s famed temple. Will Bilkis’s plan succeed or will Makeda and Yetzer outsmart her and find happiness far from her plots and intrigue?

Amazon | Barnes and Noble


Excerpt

The Master opened his mouth to continue the invocation but, instead of the expected words, a high-pitched whistle rang throughout the quarry. The workers looked about for the source of the noise. Yetzer’s eyes settled on the side of the quarry where the fire blazed before the quartz outcropping. The limestone on the fringe glowed red-orange, while the quartz shimmered behind the veil of heat.
“Water,” Huram called, and the neat assembly dissolved as men raced for the great leather bladders that sat on either side of the fire.
Huram had explained to Yetzer how firing the quartz, then rapidly quenching it with water, would make the rock brittle and more easily broken up. That had been his intent. As Yetzer watched, his father’s plan rapidly came undone.
Steam hissed from the rock face. The whistle turned into a scream. The very earth seemed to bulge around the outcropping. In a moment, Yetzer foresaw what was to happen and knew he was unable to stop it.
“No,” he screamed anyway.
He ran toward his father and Pharaoh, who stood between the water bladders. Each skin held a copper tube, which a pair of workers aimed at the furious rock. Other men lowered cedar beams atop the skins to force the water’s flow.
Huram turned toward Yetzer as he cried out, but the men were already pressing down on the bladders. Water streamed toward the outcropping and the scene was lost in a cloud of vapor.
“Yetzer, be silent,” Huram ordered, but his shout was overwhelmed as the rock’s scream rose in pitch and volume.
Yetzer leapt toward the men. Huram tried to block him, but succeeded only in knocking his son into the king. The boy managed a glance at his father, whose face was masked with fury.
Then the world shattered.
Nature slowed as Yetzer’s senses raced ahead of the disaster. A storm of destruction rolled toward him, preceded by the invisible fist of some nameless god who punched him in the chest and drove the air from his lungs. The water bladders ruptured and men were thrown off their feet. They hadn’t reached the ground before the next wave struck.
Steam rolled over the men closest to the explosion, cleansed them of the dust that coated their bodies, and turned their skin sun-red. The flood from the bladders outpaced the steam, engulfing Yetzer and protecting him from the searing wave as it passed overhead.
A flurry of dust followed and, behind this, a hail of stone shards. The air hummed with the passage of the missiles. Yetzer lifted a hand in feeble defense, even as Huram clutched his throat. A crimson mist enveloped his father just before Yetzer’s upraised hand blossomed with blood.

Guest Post

PEERING BACKWARD THROUGH THE LENS
De-constructing Legend To Find the True Story
by Marc Graham

We’ve all heard the story of the Queen of Sheba. Wasting away in her sun-worshiping idolatry, she hears of King Solomon’s legendary wisdom, travels a great distance to Jerusalem bearing gifts of gold and jewels and incense, sits at his feet to bask in his brilliance and piety, then returns to her homeland enlightened, unnamed, but much better for the experience.

That’s the most well known, Biblical version. But what of the others?
The Judaic Song of Solomon hints at a romance between the two monarchs, but still fails to name the fabled queen. (Providing prurience to the priestly class since 300 BCE. Breasts like twin fawns? Really?)

Imperial Coat of Arms of Ethiopia | Tom Lemmens [CC BY-SA 3.0
The Quran at least gives us a name, but makes Balkis (or Bilkis) a goat-legged, goose-footed infidel who may or may not have congress with demons.
In the Ethiopian national legend Kebra Negast (the Book of the Glory of Kings), she is called Makeda and is assaulted by the righteous King Solomon. Too bad for her, but it gave Ethiopia a holy(-ish) dynasty descended from King David that lasted nearly 3,000 years. Emperor Haile Selassie was deposed in 1974, but his heirs-in-exile still hold out hope for a return to the throne.
The tale that captured my imagination, though, is one I discovered in the lore of Freemasonry. While the Craft reveres King Solomon as the Founder of our Art, this version of the story suggests that the great and beautiful Queen of Sheba fell in love not with Solomon, but with Hiram Abiff, the builder of his temple to Yahweh. In a fit of jealousy and rage, Solomon sabotages the foundry where the great bronze works for the temple are being prepared. When this fails to discredit Hiram, Solomon has him kidnapped and murdered. How all this affects our Queen, we are not told.
I am a firm believer in the old adage that history is written by the victors. I’ve also been a big fan of the underdog (and Underdog) most of my life. I’m fascinated by the stories that disappear, swept away in the detritus of defeat. So how do we learn these stories?
Western history provides us a few examples, through the serendipitous discoveries of Qumran (Israel), and Nag Hammadi and Beni Masar (Egypt), all in the mid- to late-20th Century. These sites provided us with versions of the gospels that had been wiped out by the political and ecclesiastical victors of the Roman-occupied Middle East as the official version of Christianity began to take shape.
These documents (most burned, lest they otherwise be deemed gospels in their own right) paint a very different picture than the Gospels handed down to posterity by the holy and beneficent powers that be. Rather than a long-suffering anointed one who only seeks peace between the people and their political masters, we find an iconoclastic rebel who teaches personal freedom (and responsibility) and who orchestrates his own demise so that the power of the truth might be liberated for the masses.
The best-laid plans...
But these discredited gospels provide us with a template of how to read backward through history, how to peer through the other end of the looking-glass and decipher the images we’re left with.
The dominant version of the Queen of Sheba story was drafted some five hundred years after the events they purport to represent. Israel had been demolished, and her cousin Judea survived only in name. In response to the threats by foreign powers, the political and religious powers decided that a new national myth was in order. While the common folk continued to worship the ancient gods and goddesses of the land, their leaders established a new order under a single male deity, and did away with the ancient customs for good.
In crafting Song of Songs: A Novel of the Queen of Sheba, I had to look back through this lens of a fledgling monotheist patriarchy. What would men of tenuous power fear? What ancient beliefs would need to be buried by those seeking to create a new way of worship? By understanding this perspective, the needs and fears of the victors, I was able to weave a way back into the story of the underdogs, the losers of this particular piece of history.
This method of rediscovering history can serve us well. In an age when the victor-of-the-moment establishes history, when the public memory spans only a few days, storytellers need to understand how to look back. By reverse-engineering our history-as-fact and breaking it down into its basic elements, the real story, the stories of flesh-and-blood women and men, may be preserved for those who come behind us.

About the Author

Marc Graham studied mechanical engineering at Rice University in Texas, but has been writing since his first attempt at science fiction penned when he was ten. From there, he graduated to knock-off political thrillers, all safely locked away to protect the public, before settling on historical fiction. His first novel, Of Ashes and Dust, was published in March 2017.

He has won numerous writing contests including, the National Writers Assocation Manuscript Contest (Of Ashes and Dust), the Paul Gillette Memorial Writing Contest - Historical (Of Ashes and Dust, Song of Songs), and the Colorado Gold Writing Contest - Mainstream (Prince of the West, coming from Blank Slate Press in Fall 2019).

He lives in Colorado on the front range of the Rocky Mountains, and in addition to writing, he is an actor, narrator, speaker, story coach, shamanic practitioner, and whisky afficianado (Macallan 18, one ice cube). When not on stage or studio, in a pub, or bound to his computer, he can be found hiking with his wife and their Greater Swiss Mountain Dog.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Tuesday, April 16
Review & Interview at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, April 17
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Thursday, April 18
Review at Bookfever

Friday, April 19
Guest Post & Excerpt at To Read, Or Not to Read

Saturday, April 20

Monday, April 22

Tuesday, April 23
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Wednesday, April 24

Thursday, April 25

Friday, April 26

Tuesday, April 30
Review & Excerpt at Clarissa Reads it All

Wednesday, May 1

Friday, May 3

Monday, May 6

Tuesday, May 7

Thursday, May 9
Excerpt at Kimber Li

Friday, May 10

Monday, May 13

Tuesday, May 14

Wednesday, May 15
Feature at Donna's Book Blog

Friday, May 17
Review at Coffee and Ink

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away two paperback copies of Song of Songs! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 17th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to the US & Canada only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Song of Songs


Tuesday, April 9, 2019

0 The Lost History of Dreams by Kris Waldherr #TheLostHistoryofDreams #KrisWaldherr #BookBirthday #HFVBTBlogTours

Today is the publication day for Kris Waldherr’s THE LOST HISTORY OF DREAMS! In this captivating debut novel in the gothic tradition of Wuthering Heights and The Thirteenth Tale, a post-mortem photographer unearths dark secrets of the past that may hold the key to his future.


When famed Byronesque poet Hugh de Bonne is discovered dead in his bath one morning in 1850, the task of burying his body falls to his estranged cousin, historian turned postmortem photographer Robert Highstead. De Bonne’s will instructs that he should be buried in an unusual chapel, a stained glass folly set on the Shropshire moors, built to house the remains of his beloved wife and muse, Ada. It has since been locked to all outsiders—especially the rabid, cultlike fans of de Bonne’s final book, The Lost History of Dreams. Only Ada’s grief-stricken niece, Isabelle, holds the key—but she refuses to open the glass chapel unless Robert agrees to her bargain: Before he can lay Hugh to rest, Robert must record the real story behind her aunt’s ill-fated marriage over the course of five nights.

Sweeping and darkly atmospheric, THE LOST HISTORY OF DREAMS is a Gothic mystery about love and loss that blurs the line between past and present, truth and fiction, and ultimately, life and death. And remember, all love stories are ghost stories in disguise.

Now available at LostHistoryBook.com.

Read the first three chapters: Download EPUB | Download PDF | Read online

The Lost History of Dreams by Kris Waldherr

Publication Date: April 9, 2019
Atria Books
Hardcover & eBook; 320 Pages
Genre: Historical/Gothic/Mystery


A post-mortem photographer unearths dark secrets of the past that may hold the key to his future, in this captivating debut novel in the gothic tradition of Wuthering Heights and The Thirteenth Tale.

All love stories are ghost stories in disguise.

When famed Byronesque poet Hugh de Bonne is discovered dead of a heart attack in his bath one morning, his cousin Robert Highstead, a historian turned post-mortem photographer, is charged with a simple task: transport Hugh’s remains for burial in a chapel. This chapel, a stained glass folly set on the moors of Shropshire, was built by de Bonne sixteen years earlier to house the remains of his beloved wife and muse, Ada. Since then, the chapel has been locked and abandoned, a pilgrimage site for the rabid fans of de Bonne’s last book, The Lost History of Dreams.

However, Ada’s grief-stricken niece refuses to open the glass chapel for Robert unless he agrees to her bargain: before he can lay Hugh to rest, Robert must record Isabelle’s story of Ada and Hugh’s ill-fated marriage over the course of five nights.

As the mystery of Ada and Hugh’s relationship unfolds, so does the secret behind Robert’s own marriage—including that of his fragile wife, Sida, who has not been the same since the tragic accident three years ago, and the origins of his own morbid profession that has him seeing things he shouldn’t—things from beyond the grave.

Kris Waldherr effortlessly spins a sweeping and atmospheric gothic mystery about love and loss that blurs the line between the past and the present, truth and fiction, and ultimately, life and death.

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Praise for The Lost History of Dreams

“Scheherazade-like … haunting… Waldherr writes that ‘love stories are ghost stories in disguise.’ This one, happily, succeeds as both.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“An unexpected delight that grows steadily more compelling as its pages fly by.” —Booklist

“A sensual, twisting gothic tale that embraces Victorian superstition much in the tradition of A.S. Byatt’s Possession, Diane Setterfield’s The Thirteenth Tale and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights.”—BookPage

“Eerily atmospheric and gorgeously written, The Lost History of Dreams is a Gothic fairy-tale to savor.” – Kate Quinn, New York Times bestselling author of THE ALICE NETWORK and THE HUNTRESS

“The Lost History of Dreams is a dark, shimmering gem of a novel, glittering with love lost, secrets kept, and long-buried truths revealed. Wonder, memory, death and passion haunt every page of Kris Waldherr’s powerhouse Gothic debut.” – Greer Macallister, bestselling author of THE MAGICIAN’S LIE and WOMAN 99

“Brooding, romantic, and thoughtful, The Lost History of Dreams is a rare bird in that it shines throughout with wit. I loved every page of it.” – Erika Swyler, bestselling author of THE BOOK OF SPECULATION and LIGHT FROM OTHER STARS

“With luminous prose, stunning poetry and a fascinating cast of characters, Waldherr weaves a wonderfully atmospheric tale. Not to be missed!” – Hazel Gaynor, New York Times bestselling author of THE GIRL WHO CAME HOME and THE LIGHTHOUSE KEEPER’S DAUGHTER

“A riveting, addictive read. Sarah Waters fans will be entranced. – Mary Sharratt, author of ECSTASY and DAUGHTERS OF THE WITCHING HILL

“A novel of haunting mystery and passion reminiscent of Wuthering Heights and Byatt’s Possession.” – Crystal King, author of FEAST OF SORROW and THE CHEF’S SECRET

“An atmospheric tale of lost love, family secrets, and an inquiry into how our own histories define us, I relished every poetic page.” – Heather Webb, international bestselling author of LAST CHRISTMAS IN PARIS and THE PHANTOM’S APPRENTICE

"With beautiful prose and poetry, Waldherr weaves a darkly seductive Gothic tale of love, art, death, and obsession. You’ll want to keep reading this one late into the night.” – Alyssa Palombo, author of THE SPELLBOOK OF KATRINA VAN TASSEL

“A sumptuous feast for all the senses.” – Clarissa Harwood, author of IMPOSSIBLE SAINTS and BEAR NO MALICE

About the Author

Kris Waldherr is an award-winning author, illustrator, and designer. She is a member of the Historical Novel Society, and her fiction has been awarded with fellowships by the Virginia Center of the Creative Arts and a reading grant by Poets & Writers.

Kris Waldherr works and lives in Brooklyn in a Victorian-era house with her husband, the anthropologist-curator Thomas Ross Miller, and their young daughter.

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